There Is An App For That!

by Maisha Razzaque

“Noom isn’t just your average dieting app. It’s goal-oriented psychotherapy that helps you think critically about the food you’re eating.” I heard this pitch a few weeks ago during a radio ad, and I thought: wow, I like that way of looking at food tracking. I’d totally use this app.

Except I already have.

Here is a comprehensive list of apps I have used, am using, or have downloaded with the idea of future usage in order to regulate and maybe even improve my productivity, diet, and overall physical and emotional health: Noom (food and exercise tracking), Clue (period and ovulation tracker), doc.ai (personalized health data), Calm (mood tracking), Sayana (mood tracking), 30 Day Fitness (exercise tracking), Lifesum (Macro Tracker), Flora (habit tracking), Reflectly (anxiety tracking), Focus Keeper (time management)— I’ll stop here. You get the point; there are a lot.

Reading a book, going for a run, eating a meal, and relaxing are all supposed to be pretty uncomplicated activities for most people. Yet, I — and I suspect an alarming number of others — have overcomplicated it to a point of chaos. The question remains: why did I convince myself that I need a billion apps to regulate my life?

Six years of being in school has taught me to look to the research. According to the Health and Wellness Foundation, 60 million people in the United States are using some sort of mobile health app. And, as studies indicate, a majority of those users are female millennials. The promise of these apps basically can be boiled down to something called the Health Belief Model. Developed in the 1950s, the Health Belief Model is a systemic method that identifies health behavior; the main gist of it is that an individual’s intention to “engage in health behavior” (positive or negative) is directly related to how vulnerable to health threats they believe themselves to be. The user will act according to his/her own perceived strengths and weaknesses. Health apps enable self-monitoring which, in theory, should lead to some positive effects. Mobile health apps are essentially a user-friendly tracking journal on your phone, and for the most part you don’t have to analyze your own data because the app does it for you. It can even be helpful to bring this sort of data to your healthcare provider if you’re trying to manage a chronic condition (e.g. blood sugar, blood pressure, heart rate, etc).

When it’s put that way, it doesn’t sound so bad, so what could go wrong? It turns out, a lot.

What starts out as helpful information from well-intentioned apps can turn into data overload. As a result, this can exacerbate health anxiety — a phenomenon in which a person has an irrational preoccupation with possible health threats. For people with certain proclivities to obsess over calorie/exercise tracking, these apps can actually be enablers of unhealthy behaviors. There is also the question of validity. Many mobile health products are self-report models. What if you don’t know the exact calorie count in a home-made meal or the “intensity level” — something a version of MyFitnessPal has asked users to report — of your cardio exercise? Without valid data, the analysis provided by these apps is not useful to managing health at all!

Last of all, we have to look at the money.

In 2019, the mobile health app industry made $3 billion in sales. A lot of this money is coming from advertising, but what the average user might not know about is the amount of personal data being harvested and sold to third party companies. In 2018, several period app companies including Glow and Flo got into hot water because they were selling personal data about people’s menstrual cycles to companies that were, in turn, using them to create targeted ads. Suddenly, aggressive online ads for baby clothes and cribs would coincide with a missed period. But is hot water the right way to describe the backlash? There were no legal consequences; In fact, most of these apps have tiny, tiny print stating that you’re allowing them to do whatever they want with your health data the moment you tap “install.”

But surely, you’re thinking, there are some legal standards to protect people from this kind of predatory data mining.

That’s just the thing. Mobile health apps have taken the market by storm and seemingly transforming how people are looking at health management overnight. The legislation has simply not had the time to catch up. The sheer vastness of the mobile health market makes it hard for the average user to judge quality. The FDA’s oversight of mobile health products has been met with a lot of handwringing. Pushback from the industry has been hanging on the argument that overregulation could hamper growth and innovation. Nathan Cortez, a law professor at the Southern Methodist University, has suggested broadening the FDA’s jurisdiction. In a 2014 article about FDA regulation of mobile health apps, he argues that the existing legislation that limits the FDA’s involvement is bad for doctors and dangerous for health app users. He proposes that Congress should consider allowing a professional third-party to evaluate the algorithm and quality safeguards outlined in an FDA regulatory guides. Since then, a 2017 redraft of the FDA’s regulatory guidelines has tightened regulations of diagnostic apps — ones that physicians use to aid with making clinical diagnoses. The wheels of government regulation turn slowly — so, so slowly — but surely.

What I’m piecing together from this crash course on mobile health products is that these too-good-to-be true apps might not work, may be using my personal data, and aren’t being closely regulated. But why did I convince myself I needed so many of them in the first place? The answer, as you may expect, isn’t quite so simple. It can be broken down into a few pieces. Maybe I may have not been the one doing the convincing. If everyone is touting the newest and best app that’s transforming their lives, it’s natural that I should want in. When my favorite disembodied nutrition podcast host voice tells me to take control of my life by downloading Noom, I just may do it. Perhaps, I — and the aforementioned millions of users — have fallen prey to the phenomenon of “too much data”; it’s very easy to rationalize that somehow having “more” apps is the same thing as having “better” apps. Then before you know it, you’ve used up all your phone storage on six different AI Mindfulness apps. Despite all this, I haven’t reached the conclusion that the apps are bad. After all, people just want to take an active role in their health. Understanding mobile health apps can help us critically think about which ones can better meet our needs and which ones are just unnecessary noise.

Sources:

Local Esports Gaming Hubs!

by Semra Zamurad

As an avid gamer myself, I was drawn to the Esports Cyberathlete Development (ECD) co-design group’s mission: to gain a better understanding of how gaming supports positive social and cognitive growth in cyberathletes. My educational background is rooted in psychology and I am interested in how technology can be used to benefit psychological background and research. To learn more about this, I am lending my expertise in studying human behavior from a biopsychosocial standpoint to the efforts of the ECD team.

As we move forward on our academic journey, we have discovered the necessity of operationally defining the behaviors we seek to understand and making sure that those definitions remain consistent across raters. To operationally define a behavior essentially means to define a behavior in a specific, concrete, and measurable way. This is especially important when more than one researcher will be taking part in an observation. For example, if we were looking for signs of exhaustion, one observer may consider rubbing eyes to be a sign of exhaustion while another observer does not. High levels of inter-rater reliability (referring to how similar the data collection is between the observers) are imperative to the success of study that has key qualitative components. As such, I was tasked with looking into places that the ECD co-design group could practice observing gamers in their natural environment, as well as compiling a list of non-academic resources members could use to supplement their general knowledge of gaming culture.

The following list refers to several locations within the DFW complex that offer gamers and those interested in learning more about Esports a site to gather at and to take part in the experience there.

  • EZ Gaming Café
    • Vibe: minimalistic; snacks and drinks offered from deep freezer, metal shelves
      • Hosts local tournaments
      • Offers PC gaming and consoles (Nintendo Switch, PS4)
  • Nerdvana
    • Vibe: “Games with your coffee” kind of place; café/bar first, with games you can play while eating/drinking
      • Café and board games
      • Bar and videogames
      • Free to play with minimum $10/person purchase
  • Geekletes
    • Vibe: grassroots Esports competitions that serves as a training ground for aspiring gamers
      • Host local tournaments
      • Provide courses on how to navigate and excel in the industry
      • Recruiting and exposure
  • Java Gaming Café
    • Vibe: minimalistic but luxurious
      • Serves drinks to players at their PCs
      • Two floors
      • Hosts local tournaments
      • Offers PC gaming and consoles (PS4, Wii U, Xbox One)
  • PLAYlive Nation at Stonebriar Centre
    • Vibe: social gaming lounge housed in Frisco, powered by Simplicity Esports (merged); high-tech aesthetic (blue neon lights, generally dark, leather seating)
      • Specializes in Xbox One and popular table games (e.g., Magic the Gathering)
      • Offers VR gaming
  • AK PC Gaming Café
    • Vibe: similar look to an office building; identifies as an Internet café
      • PC gaming, web browsing, workstation
      • Offers food and drinks (snacks, soft drinks, coffee, fries)
  • Esports Stadium Arlington Gaming Center
    • Vibe: largest dedicated Esports facility in North America
      • Offers PC gaming and consoles (PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One)
        • Must bring your own controllers and headsets, or rent some from them
      • Hosts local tournaments
      • Offers food, drinks, and merchandise

However, simply being aware of the existence of these places may prove to be insufficient in supplementing our comprehension of gaming culture even if we were to visit. In order to effectively supplement our collective knowledge on Esports and gaming in general, I also put together a list of non-academic resources that are easily accessible and may explain cultural concepts in a simpler fashion. This list includes apps, attractions, and movies to gain a better understanding of Esports’ evolution.

  • WEBTOON: No Scope by ZOYANG
    • A webcomic about a fictional Esports game called PSI BOND and high school players attempting to become pro players
    • Gives insight into player housing, recruiting, team building, basic aspects of Esports, women in Esports, Esports in Korea
  • WEBTOON: Let’s Play by Mongie
    • A webcomic about a game developer whose game is given a bad review by an Internet celebrity (“lets-player”).
    • Gives insight into different types of games and gamers, impact of a gaming-centered career on mental and physical health, skills necessary to excel in a gaming-centered career (mainly game development)

  • BBC documentary: The Supergamers/Rise of the Supergamer
    • Looks into the lives of select teams and players as they train, live together, and learn to play together, striving for the common goal of making it big as a cyberathlete
Preview

  • Netflix documentary: League of Legends Origins
    • Details the rise of the popular MMOBA game League of Legends, its start as a free demo to an Esport game
Trailer

If you or someone you know enjoys visiting any of the aforementioned gaming points or is aware of more non-academic resources that can help explain gaming culture, please feel free to contact the Esports Co-Design Group Project Manager, Lauren Bernal, at Lauren.Bernal@UTDallas.edu.

Franklin Osuagwu transitions out of role of Lab Coordinator

Franklin Osuagwu’s timeline as Lab Coordinator at the ArtSciLab.

Franklin Osuagwu started working at the ArtSciLab in June 2019. After the exit of Kyle, he came in as the new Lab Coordinator. While working at the lab, his major duties were organizing the MOWG meetings, organizing the weekly watering hole events, and finally creating a cybersecurity plan for the Lab. As he steps ahead in his career path moving forward, he conducts a final interview with Alex Topete on his experience and next moves.

What was his first Introduction to the ArtSciLab?

Franklin initially had no prior knowledge about the Lab. Being an electrical engineering major, he had no information about activities going on in ATEC, least of all, the Watering Hole. He found about the lab through the lab coordinator job posting on Handshake last summer.

How did Franklin rate his experience at the ArtSciLab?

Franklin loved his time at the ArtSciLab. He always found a chance to speak about how Roger and the rest of his coworkers were. He was able to make new valuable and professional connections. One thing he mentioned he loved mostly the lab was that it also served as his new “chilling spot” in between his classes.

Is there any new skill that Franklin picked up through his experience?

Franklin indicated that his management skills were on an all time high. His constant interaction with people in the lab helped him know how to manage and deal with people in an ideal work environment.

Difficulties while working at the Lab?

Franklin mentioned that one of his major issues was communication. In terms of people responding to emails on timely manner. He further mentioned that he would have loved a better attendance of lab events by its members, more especially the Watering Hole held weekly.

Where is he heading next?

Franklin is currently working as an IT intern at Epsilon. His internship is expected to run from January till December when he graduates. He will still maintain relationships with the Lab, serving as a Lab ambassador.

His final note his former teammates and coworkers are “Be sure to catch me at future watering holes.”

UTD ARTSCILAB Lab Ambassador Appointed to enable ArtSci connections Abroad

February 2020, the University of Texas at Dallas ArtSciLab appoints Jacob Hunwick as Lab Ambassador for the duration of his study abroad program in Germany. He starts at Phillips University Marburg on February the 18th and finishes on June the 12th. In addition, lab director Roger Malina appoints Jacob as an intern representative for the Leonardo Journal in Europe. 

Jacob will work to research, discover and document exemplars of art-science and well-being. Through his studies in ATEC at UT Dallas, Jacob has found a passion for technologies that prioritize the preservation and promotion of healthy habits and lifestyles. 

Through his weekly blog posts, he will report on interviews, events, and interactions with new organizations and people related to technologies that prioritize human health. 

The following is a summary of his research interests that he will pursue and write about in his weekly blog.

Research Goal for Lab Ambassador Position

Ideally, interaction designers want interfaces designed for everyday use to develop into healthy habits. Unfortunately, screen-based interfaces and modern city infrastructure trends promote sedentary habits.  

Infinitely scrolling pages and endless content tunnels enable users to over-dose on screen-time. Common use of screens for education, entertainment, and leisure time encourage people to abandon physical activity. And lastly, American city infrastructures discourage walking with a hyper focus on the automobile. 

Through my research, I seek interfaces with modern technology that improve human well-being. I seek infrastructure that empowers us to rely on our legs, not motors, to travel and navigate urban environments. I seek products that involve motion and break through the 2-dimensional touch screen barrier. I seek educational tools that encourage children to learn through active motion and participation rather than passive consumption.  

Trough the theories of embodied cognition, designers know that external objects can influence our cognitive processes. Now, the field of interaction design has realized the power that designed objects and experiences has over how we understand the world. While abroad, I will search for and document exemplars of health-conscious technologies that use the theories of embodied cognition to build healthy habits. 

To those interested in my research goal contact me via email at jmh170830@utdallas.edu. I look forward to traveling all around Europe in pursuit of my mission. 

-Jacob Hunwick 

ArtSci Abroad logo created by Jacob Hunwick.

ArtSciLab Talkshow: A new series on The Bold Roast

Produced and created by Maisha Razzaque, a new series has launched on The Bold Roast: Student Conversations channel on Creative Disturbance.

The ArtSciLab is home to collaborations between artists and scientists who investigate topics such as experimental publishing, data sonification, data visualization, and the hybridization of art and science. This series is an audio experience that allows the spotlight to fall on its members as they talk to us about their careers, contributions, and passions.

Click here to listen to the first episode of The ArtSciLab Talk Show.

The Voices of Science

Before things were written they were spoken. The Spoken Word has a rich historical basis, especially amongst traditional African societies where culture and knowledge was passed down in the form of riddles, proverbs, stories, poetry, music, and design. Today, spoken word remains a fundamental form of communication, though its limits in academia are rarely challenged. Spoken word poetry is a tool to communicate social issues. Today, it is increasingly popular among the youth with so-called ‘poetry slams’ happening all around the world. Spoken word is appealing as it is impactful and lawless. There are no literary restrictions that define what it is. Instead, it takes a more performative approach, aiming to reach — even interact with — its audience; it is centered on involvement and exchange.This is what makes spoken word, as a type of poetry, powerful: It surpasses communication and creates a participatory audience. Contrastly, scientific phenomena — especially with increasing reliance on technological tools — long ago left the realm of our physical experiences. Consequently, there expands a chasm in intellectual exchange across science and other disciplines that calls for the expertise of a poet. The poet’s role will be to create innovative, metaphorical models in words and to express the often abstract and intangible phenomena in science. The very nomenclature of science, which is often times misleading, could benefit greatly from the collaboration of a poet.

It is the ability of a word to transmit meaning from one consciousness to the other that has significance and power. There is a biblical story of people of one language, building a tower with the intention to reach God. Eventually God decides to confuse them by mixing their languages — thus, the place was given the name Babel, meaning a confusion of voices in Hebrew. The sudden shift in communications, one might imagine, would lead to the development of diverse cultures and ideas. Therefore, metaphorically speaking, the growth of the tower was no longer able to be focused on only one dimension.

To a large extent, the language of science is mathematics but supplemented by words, diagrams, or images, each of which acts as a model to communicate reality. Going deeper into the study of science, particularly physics, it becomes impossible to deeply understand, let alone explain, phenomena without mathematics. One can see mathematics, the main language of science, taking a tower-like trajectory; It becomes increasingly complex and eventually, too high for unspecialized populations to reach and interact with. And when things cease to have the capacity to be understood and influenced; then, they lose their power to progress and diverge through otherwise diverse minds.

The word ‘Science’ itself carries heavy cultural connotations. Science could be seen as a dreaded school subject, a subject that is distant for people unexposed to its exciting study. How the scientist sees him/herself depends on their level of experience as a scientist. Personally, science has evolved from a de facto puzzle of a classroom study to one where there is a lot of structured seeking with a lot of room for speculation, interpretation, mistakes, evolution, and a lot of meticulous tedious work and creative planning.

Ideas of scientism stating that science is a closed box, superior to all other modes of intelligence, not only limit but harm our society.

Science affects everyone and exists in all of creation. It is understood in one way by scientists another way by artists, poets, spiritualists and other disciplines. All these distinctions are relevant for practical purposes. They are not laws. Our strength and integrity as a society will be found in open exchange between science and the other disciplines. Such permeabilities are what will allow us progress in multiple degrees of freedom, adding wealth to science studies and how we as a diverse persons view and interact with it.

One of the entry points in which such exchange can occur is our reliance on models to understand and discover new things. The very model for how learning takes place includes formation of new networks of knowledge upon already existing ones. Our minds work like an intricate web making connections in order to understand and develop ideas. In her book Models and Analogies in Science, Mary Hess makes reference to positive, negative, and neutral analogies. Negative analogies being those that we know are unable to fit into a description, positive being those that agree, and neutral being those that are unknown and have the potential to be investigated. This is where spoken word poetry comes in. Poetry would excel at making connections between science principles and unexpected elements of life, juxtaposing vivid imagery which enlivens striking metaphors and narratives — engaging the scientist, science, and everyday life.

For example the verse below:
“Our consciousness , so close, yet so distant, allows us to travel at the speed of light when we fall in love ;(that’s about a 24 times a year for me- twice a month before and after ovulation) But like two ends of the same string, we sink to normality in the greyness and redness of stuff. Though we are made of things that are the substance of light , we can only pulse in inconsistency”
This describes how time dilation, that occurs in general relativity, is the same kind that is experienced by humans when they are focused or feeling intense emotions such as pain or love. One can model traveling at the speed of light to be analogous to being deeply focused or in intense enjoyment where the actual time is moving much faster than the time internally experienced. It also touches on the wave particle duality, and the relationship between physiology and personality.
Spoken word could lead to a plethora of analogies with the potential to be sorted and investigated. Neutral analogy is just one of the pathways that could lead to research investigation, thereby spoken word poetry is a prime example of art as a research method. It can clearly be used in learning. It’s not uncommon for fantastical scenarios such as: “ What if you found yourself in space holding a….” to be used in a classroom question, but it is often not taken further. Though metaphors might shift from their origin, they always find their way back in some form. Vital is the kind of imagery and metaphorical tension existent in engaging spoken word narratives that trigger the mind’s imagination in ways that information in itself could never dream of.

“Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world,” (Albert Einstein).

Spoken word most importantly holds the power to open room for discourse between unexpected combinations of people.

There seems to me, a great potential to develop scientific spoken word exchanges for the stage, research, learning, creating art, and cultural revolutions.

References

“What is Science” by Sundar Sarukkai
“A review of African Oral traditions and literature”: by Harold Schlub
“Ways of Seeing” by John Berger
“Making science intimate” by Roger Malina
“Science et cetera et cetera for poets et cetera” by John A Moore
“Genesis” Judaic Bible

Graziella’s Journey as a Junior Designer at the ArtSciLab

project-besso

Graziella “Ela” Detecio worked on the ArtSciLab team as a Junior Designer. During her time here, she contributed to the design of project and marketing materials of the lab. As it’s time for her to move on to the next step in her career, Yvan Tina, team leader of Creative Disturbance, sat down with Ela and asked her a few questions as a part of her transition out of the ArtSciLab.

What attracted her to the ArtSciLab position?

Ela found the ArtSciLab through cofounder, Cassini Nazir. This job was a chance for her to gain design and marketing experience and work toward her career goals: consulting or client-based work for a creative marketing or design firm.

How did Ela rate her experience the ArtSciLab overall?

Towards the end, the position was not exactly what Ela expected it to be. She was expecting more graphic design and marketing work from the position and would have preferred it if there were clear goals because some of the ideas were good but seemed to “trickle into obscurity.” Creative Disturbance, though, was an overall good experience.

Is there any new skill or insight that Ela has acquired through the experience?

Ela valued the experience running the ArtSciLab website, as well as the exposure to academic research conducted in a lab.

What would she change from her experience?

After Ela’s mentor Cassini transitioned, she felt lost in her role. A more consistent art/design supervisor would have been ideal.

According to Ela, what makes a good manager and what should be their attributes?

Ela says it’s important for a manager to set an overall vision for the team by identifying practical goals to work towards. She valued Roger encouraging students to pursue their interests within the lab

What are some difficulties of teamwork?

Communication with the team is a difficulty. She found that horizontal hierarchy presents challenges for the younger student workers. Using Trello and Airtable for transparency and progress tracking can improve these issues within the lab.

What project management experience did she learn?

“I learned a lot” Ela says. The structured nature of Creative Disturbance taught her that organization can lead to improved productivity.

Where is she heading next?

Ela is joining the Student Union and Activities Advisory Board (SUAAB) at UT Dallas to work with the marketing chair on developing awareness of SUAAB on campus.

Creative Disturbance new podcast in தமிழ்

New podcast in தமிழ் by Gautam Sharma and Aadhavan Sibi

Every year, thousands of Indian students and hundreds of Tamil students make their way across the oceans towards to the land of opportunities in pursuit of their dream to master their craft. This channel is a way of trying to trace that journey by sharing the experiences of other students who are just as much trying to find their way through amazingly rewarding maze. Graduate Students Gautam Sharma and Aadhavan Sibi and with their interesting list of guests from different walks of life go through their experiences right from their Visa Interviews through finding themselves among the sea of familiar yet strange face to the dreaded job hunt. Strap on your seatbelts, we are flying to meet Uncle Sam.

In this episode of A mudhal America varai, “Visa Villangam” Gautam Sharma and Aadhavan Sibi discuss the villangams involved in the nerve-wracking process of getting your visa approved and your flight experience. From the WhatsApp groups, to the long queue at the consulate, to the harrowing experience of flying out of country all by yourself, none of us did this without some help from other fellow students. This is just us trying to tell other people that they are not alone in feeling that way, by sharing our experience of how we dealt with all of that ourselves.

Listen to this episode by visiting Visa வில்லங்கம் at Creative Disturbance.

New Lab Member Introduction

Anthony Inga

Anthony Inga is an undergraduate design researcher at the UT Dallas School of Arts Technology and Emerging Communication with a background in engineering and computer science. He brings his unique eye to design through participation in the AIGA association for design, the Public Interactives Research Lab, and now as a research assistant at the ARTSCI Lab. Anthony has volunteered as a keynote speaker for non-profit organizations such as Big Thought and IxDA Dallas. Apart from school, as an employee of Wolfgang Puck Catering, he’s served as a local bartender in the Dallas area for several years, though he finds himself most at his element when mixing his minimal visual style in concert with unique interactive solutions.

As a collaborator of the lab, Anthony will be developing his capstone project in which he will be investigating restaurant menu designs, particularly cocktail menus, on how they might be reimagined using psychology, art, and technology to better inform the customer of the selections in hopes to raise satisfaction rates. Through the lab, Anthony hopes to gain experiences as a project manager and creative researcher. Apart from this, he will assist the lab in extending its international network to Peru through his own connections as he is also a native to the country’s capital city, Lima.

Anthony has served as an informal collaborator in the past, but is now excited to hit the ground running as one of the newest official lab members!