Updates from CDASH

A National Convening on the Integration the Arts, Humanities, and STEMM

We are pleased to inform you – as collaborators and cloud curriculum members – of the progress of our CDASH website! On the Home page, our “SPOTLIGHT: What’s New!” section introduces The University of Texas at Dallas’ umbrella project, ToTTS: Tale of Two Thinking Systems. The umbrella consists of six promising initiatives within the ArtSciLab that will be presented in Washington, D.C. at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Convention in April 2019.

In the Spring of 2018, Dr. Kathryn Evans conducted a study, Moving the Needle, measuring the change in her Music, Science and Technology students’ attitudes on science-music integration. This investigation and its findings will also be presented by Dr. Evans at the NASEM Convention. The demo session will be recorded and will be included in the NASEM online toolkit as a resource for practitioners interested in implementing integrative approaches in their teaching.

We welcome our newest Research Assistant in UTD’s ArtSciLab, Lauren Bernal. Lauren is a senior Psychology major who brings a background of research and behavioral and brain sciences perspective to our interest in transdisciplinary curriculum.

Our Brazilian collaborator, Joao Silveira at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, recently completed his ArtSci for Education: Activity Report, February 2019. Soon, the original Portuguese report along with the English translated version will be posted on the CDASH site. We are delighted to share his findings over transdisciplinary.

Much more to come! We are excited about the response and look forward to many more courses, syllabi and resources for you. Help us spread the word by sending the link https://cdash.atec.io to your friends in the art-science community.

Kathryn Evans and the CDASH team
cdash@utdallas.edu

Exploring Visual Poetry: ArtSide Workshop at the 2018 RAW Conference

by Kuo-Wei Lee, Shruthy Sreepathy, Yusra Khan

Students from the ArtSciLab hosted on ArtSide,at the 10th annual RAW: Research-Art-Writing Conference at The University of Texas at Dallas in February.
Kuo-Wei Lee (M.A. ’18, Arts and Technology), Shruthy Sreepathy, and Yusra Khan (both M.S. ’18, Applied Cognition and Neuroscience) presented ArtSide: Enhancing the Connection Between Cities and Communities. ArtSide—Lee’s master’s thesis, first prototyped in Professor Cassini Nazir’s Creating Interactive Media course—aims to enhance the social experience of public art through social and technological and strengthen the relationship between city and its communities. Continue reading “Exploring Visual Poetry: ArtSide Workshop at the 2018 RAW Conference”

Lab Welcomes Visiting Researcher

Welcome João!
We are pleased to announce that João Silveira has been appointed as a Visiting ArtScience Researcher in the ArtSciLab. João will be collaborating with other members of the lab to understand and analyze current ArtScience developments internationally.

João Silveira is a Brazilian dancer with experience of over 4000 career performances on tours around the world. Trained as a pharmacist, he explores art and science in his work, is Founder of the ArteCiencia project and author of the book Da Ideia ao Aplauso
Born in southern Brazil in 1980, João started to dance at the age of 10. His professional life as a dancer began when he was 14 years old, performing in shows, creating choreographies and teaching dance classes.
Since then, he has built up a very consistent career participating in both national and international productions, always mixing in boleadoras, folkloric ballet, tap, percussion, traditional music, electronic music and any other style that could improve his performance. The United States, Argentina, France, Japan, Lebanon, Monaco, Paraguay, Uruguay, Germany, and Romania are some of the countries where he has already shown his work as well as more than 300 cities throughout Brazil.
João is also a pharmacist. With his multidisciplinary background in art and science, João is a Harvard Research Fellow – Faculty of Arts & Sciences (SEAS) and is completing a PhD in Science at the Medical Biochemistry Department at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He is studying the “Art, artist and artistic interaction with science.” The goal is to investigate how interactions between art and science occur, and what are the results of these two fields having dialogue based on a contemporary investigation of projects in Brazil and the United States.
You can read more about João and his work on Harvard’s website and at joaosilveira.org

New Website for Curriculum Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities

We are excited to announce the launch of CDASH 2.0! 
Project leads Kathryn Evans, Roger Malina, and Eun Ah Lee are pleased to announce the re-launch of our 2012 project studying Curriculum Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities at cdash.atec.io.
Leonardo Executive Editor Roger Malina and  UT Dallas faculty member Kathryn Evans are inventorying examples of courses and curricula that are in the art-science–humanities field such as courses on art and biology, music and mathematics, art and chemistry, dance and environmental sciences, etc. The re-launched CDASH inventory includes over 120 courses. We are seeking courses at the graduate, undergraduate and primary/secondary level.
Individuals who have taught an art-science-humanities course at the university or secondary-school level, in formal or informal settings, are invited to submit their course on our new CDASH website.
After you log in or register, you may submit you course through an easy-to-complete form.  Those who submit syllabi will have access to the Cloud Curriculum portion of the site, where they can access other syllabi and resource material.
We are interested in the broad range of curriculum that combines the performing and visual arts (music, dance, theatre, film, visual arts and new media) and the sciences. We are looking for submissions of in-person, on-line and hybrid blended courses.
Our new website allows you to easily enter your course and all the relevant details.  Please log in or register before you submit your course. You may also access the other areas of the site. Those who submit syllabi will be admitted to the Cloud Curriculum, where you can download other syllabi and resources.
This project is co-sponsored by The ArtSciLab at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD),  the UTD School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication , and The UTD Center for Teaching and Learning.
For more information, contact us at cdash@utdallas.edu.

Collaborator Kathryn Evans to Defend Doctoral Dissertation

kathryn-evansKathryn Evans is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Art and Technology, with an emphasis on arts education in the 21st century. To that end, she will be presenting her dissertation entitled “Does Studying Music and Sound Design Enhance Academic Abilities in Non-Music Majors: A Phenomenological Approach” on Tuesday, November 8 at 10 am on campus in ATC 1.201.

About Kathryn Evans

Ms. Evans currently holds M. A. degrees in Mathematics and Music from the University of California, San Diego. Evans’ interests include enhancing the cultural environment at the University for students, faculty, staff and the community at large; and creation of an arts curriculum that uses technology to enhance the marketability of students with arts degrees.
A singer, conductor, director and producer of many diverse talents, Ms. Evans has performed and directed music composed from 1200 to contemporary times using a variety of settings and styles. An accomplished recitalist and chamber musician, Ms. Evans has completed tours of music for voice and guitar with fellow faculty member Dr. Enric Madriguera in Austria, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Mexico, Spain and Latin America.
Ms. Evans is currently the head of the Vocal and Choral division of the School of Arts and Humanities at The University of Texas at Dallas, where she directs the UT Dallas Chamber Singers, teaches vocal instruction, opera theatre workshop and a variety of music history courses.
Ms. Evans was the Associate Dean for the Arts of the School of Arts and Humanities at The University of Texas at Dallas from 1999 to 2010. She was awarded the School of Arts and Humanities Distinguished Service Award in 2010 for her years of service in this position.

Marcel Cage and John Duchamp perform REUNION at Nine Evenings 2 in Seattle


On October 28, 2016 ArtSciLab team members will be performing “Data Stethoscope” brain connectome data in Seattle. Performance is dedicated to celebration of the 50th anniversary of Nine Evenings held in New York by EAT and Bell labs in 1966. 
The performing team includes: artist/musician Scot Gresham Lancaster, Tim Perkis, neuroscientist Gagan Wig and Roger Malina. The project includes also neuroscientists Micaela Chan and Neil Savalia, Art and Technology PhD student Veena Somareddy and the Make or Break gaming company, with Mike Leach and Robert Nally. A truly transdisciplinary, inter-generational, intercultural  team.
The performance will include the FMRI brain Connectome data sets for cohorts of 20, 40, 60, 80 year old. Gagan developed  a team to understand the way brain interconnections evolve with age and experience for healthy adults. The hope is to identify precursor anomalies that may lead to cognitive problems. The software has been developed with the use of data sonification to augment the data visualization of the networks, hence the title ‘data stethoscope”.
Scot Gresham Lancaster, Tim Perkis and Andrew Blanton will be performing three solos, with differing aesthetic approaches to the visualization and sound. At the conclusion of the performance, Scot has designed a chess board interface in homage to John Cage and Marcel Duchamp, who in 1968 performed a celebrated game of chess that triggered sound and music that they titled ”Reunion”.
Detailed story of the piece.
cageduchamp-300x221
Scot has invited Gagan and Roger to be chess performers for this chess performance in homage to John Cage and Marcel Duchamp, hence the meme John Duchamp and Marcel Cage!
To underline the appropriateness of this device, board was practiced by  University of Texas at Dallas Chess Team, which repeatedly wins national and international chess tournaments. Special thanks go out to James Stallings, Director of UTD chess program, and  to International master Zurabi Javakhadze from Georgia, who is ATEC major and member of ArtScience Lab. According to Roger Malina: his father, scientist-artist Frank Malina was an avid chess player and at home, playing chess was often the social platform for art-science technology discussions.
Scot Gresham Lancaster provides this personal recollection:
”Earlier in my career I had the opportunity to work closely with composer/performers John Cage and David Tudor. It was John Cage that connected me with Lowell Cross who designed the photoelectric enabled chess board that was an important part of the “Reunion” electro-acoustically enhanced chess match between Cage and Marcel Duchamp. I received the circuit for this chess board from Mr. Cross and built a working version of the board for a reenactment of the piece for a celebration of Cage’s work at a memorial concert at Mills College in Oakland,CA in 1998. This cemented my interest in using chess play as a source of indeterminacy as a  Post-Cage style musical performance organizing principle.
Fast forward some years later and we are working with the Art/Science lab and the Center for Vital Longevity at UTD and discover that the university has a world class chess program with full scholarships and several World Grand Masters. That program also has a new generation of digital chess boards that can be used to digitally communicate the moves of a chess game in real time. The opportunity arose to use the Art part of our Art/Science collaboration presented itself with an invitation for us to participate in the 50th Anniversary of the historic Engineering Art and Technology (EAT) 9 evenings performance. This time in Seattle and entitled 9E2. This is a wonderful opportunity for us to show our work and dedication to  really fully playing at the Art/Science boundary.
The Artists on the team are seasoned performers with decades of experience but the thought occurred to us that we could integrate the symbolic representation of brain activity, the chess game, as a way to get the scientists on the project directly involved in the performance itself. So while we are using a good part of the evening to directly create music using the tools we have been developing to research by visualizing and sonifying fMRI and EEG data in many different ways. Some of these techniques proved useful for the scientists, but all were created with an idea that they would be part of a human experience and therefore be crafted to bear some artistic interest. By the end of the evening the scientists themselves are driving the form of the visual and sonic interactions directly from the chess moves they are making. The symbolic meeting of the minds driving the multi sensory experience the audience is witnessing.
Special thanks go out to James Stalling of the UTD chess program, of course, the director of the two labs collaborating on this complex and fascinating project, Drs. Roger Malina and Gagan Wig and finally my artistic collaborators Andrew Blanton and Tim Perkis.”
Here is What Malina has to say about the event:
”We are unbearable excited as we countdown for tonight’s performance! I must admit this Art-Science collaboration is one of the most interesting and difficult projects I have been involved in – more difficult than most of the research projects in astrophysics that I have been involved in, for NASA or the European and French Space Agencies! The goal of having an art-science collaboration develop both research software that will help Gagan’s team make scientific discoveries and also the artists perform compelling art is a sweet spot of art-science practice.”
 
Event 9e2 is an art exhibition and performance series commemorating “9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering,” an iconic exhibition 50 years ago in New York that sparked a new era of collaboration between artists, scientists, and engineers.

Interdisciplinary Literature Come Together in ATEC Lab's New Online Reading Platform


For scholarly work that exists outside the realm of traditional peer-reviewed journals, outlets for getting research recognized and read can be few and far between.
To overcome this challenge, the ArtSciLab, UT Dallas’ transdisciplinary research lab, recently launched ARTECA. The new online reading platform will serve as a curated space for academic literature at the intersection of the arts, humanities, science and technology.
A collaborative effort between the ArtSciLab, the MIT Press and the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), ARTECA includes an expanding collection of more than 200 books and access to three MIT Press journals.
“The ArtSciLab seeks to be a pioneer in the field of experimental publishing. We hope to probe, test and experiment with new ways for professionals to document their work and show it to others,” said Dr. Roger Malina, Arts and Technology Distinguished Chair and director of the lab. “ARTECA provides a way for us to ‘beta test’ the future for the art-science-technology community.”
Malina said the aim is for ARTECA to enable new collaborative practices within transdisciplinary social communities, an idea he embodies as a physicist and astronomer working in the arts.
Chaz Lilly BA’11, MA’15, a research assistant for the project and a doctoral candidate in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication (ATEC), said the aggregator was modeled after MIT CogNet, a similar MIT Press platform that consolidates literature in the brain and cognitive sciences.
“There are a lot of issues in how we disseminate research in academia,” Lilly said. “We live in a digital world where online research and publishing is an immediate resource, but a lot of it doesn’t reach its audience without an access point.”
With CogNet, the MIT Press developed a platform that facilitates access to more than 700 books, six journals and 13 reference works, and subscriptions from more than 100 academic institutions. The hope is to re-create its success with ARTECA.
“We’re thrilled to be working with ISAST and The University of Texas at Dallas to expand the dimensions of scholarly publishing in the art, science and technology space,” said Nick Lindsay, journals director for the MIT Press. “The Press has a long-established history of bold experimentation in publishing, and ARTECA fits that tradition perfectly.”
While the site only houses books and journal issues, subsequent phases will introduce increasingly experimental resources such as podcasts, multimedia-based materials, a job board and online textbooks for massive open online courses.
The subscription-based platform has been made available at no cost to UT Dallas students and faculty linked to the campus network. Remote access is needed to use the resource off campus.
“With ARTECA, we are experimenting with a hybrid open access and paywall system,” Malina said. “Professionals who contribute to the content and quality of ARTECA will have open access.”
Malina said that authors who prefer to pay author fees and have their articles accessible via open access may do so. Other faculty and students will have access by subscribing to institutions’ libraries.
“We will also be developing functions and tools to promote and enable transdisciplinary collaboration,” Malina said.
 

Roger Malina & Paul Fishwick: Deep Personalization and Entryways

Roger Malina and Paul Fishwick talk about Deep Personalization and Entryways with Koshi Dhingra, who hosts talkstem website. Talksteam promotes conversation about the diversity of STEM and STEAM thinking in our daily lives, in our communities, and in our world.
Koshi Dhingra has a doctorate in science education from Teachers College, Columbia University, and has years of experience teaching at the middle and high school levels, as well as teaching in teacher education programs. Most recently, she served as a director of the Science and Engineering Education Center at the University of Texas at Dallas.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jzo2P3ezOiI

Clark Scholars Boost Research Skills Through Summer Program

Twenty-four UT Dallas students, most of them freshmen, got a head start on their undergraduate experiences by spending nine weeks this summer conducting research on campus.
The Anson L. Clark Summer Research Program, coordinated by the Office of Undergraduate Education, saw projects ranging from the development of prosthetic casings to the design of “smart” agricultural systems. Students recently displayed their research results during a poster presentation and symposium. Incoming UT Dallas students who have been awarded Academic Excellence Scholarships are eligible to apply to be Clark Scholars. No previous research experience is necessary.
“Every year I’m amazed at how these students progress in nine short weeks, both socially and in their grasp of advanced research methods,” said Courtney Brecheen, associate dean in the Office of Undergraduate Education. “For many, participation in this program is their first chance to socialize with other university students and become acclimated to campus. It doesn’t take long before they really come together as a group, and by the end of the summer, they have mastered the art of articulating complex research to a general audience.”
The 2016 class of Clark Scholars collaborated with mentors in School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication (ATEC), the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. Nearly all of the students intend to continue their research with their mentors’ lab groups during the upcoming year, Brecheen said.
Dr. Paul Pantano, associate professor of chemistry and past recipient of the Provost’s Award for Faculty Excellence in Undergraduate Research Mentoring, serves as the program’s scientific adviser.
Among the participants was Joel Ewing, a first-year ATEC student, who worked with Cassini Nazir, ATEC professor and director of design and research of ArtSciLab, and Dr.Roger Malina  Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, to design a website. ARTECA — a collaboration between UT Dallas’ ArtSciLab, which Malina directs, and the MIT Press — will be an online curated space of essential content in an interdisciplinary field where art, science and technology meet.

2
ATEC student Joel Ewing helped design a website that aggregates scholarly content in an interdisciplinary field that combines art, science and technology. Dr. Roger Malina, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, was his faculty mentor.

 
“The problem was, there was no central place to access materials related to this field,” Ewing said. “When ARTECA is launched, UT Dallas students will have free access to it, and other universities can subscribe. My role as a designer was to look for and address issues that affect user experience.”
Hannah Barber, a first-year student in biomedical engineering who led a collaborative project with ATEC students to design and produce decorative casings for lower limb prosthetics. She worked with faculty mentor Dr. Robert Gregg, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering, along with students of Andrew Scott, associate professor of arts and technology.
Computer science students Daniel Garcia and Christopher Janusa spent the summer working together to develop “smart” electronics for agriculture applications. Their faculty mentor was Dr. Subbarayan Venkatesan, professor of computer science.
“There is a need for agriculture systems that are automated, simple to use and configurable,” Garcia said. “This could include systems like automated irrigation and temperature control.”
The students envisioned a smart system that includes sensors and actuators that monitor, for example, temperature and soil moisture, and could be integrated with weather data to automatically adjust irrigation and other actions according to the forecast. Users could use a web interface to regulate the system, Garcia said.
The Clark Summer Research Program is funded by an endowment from the Clark Foundation, whose philanthropy has supported scholarly endeavors at several Texas colleges and universities, such as the Anson L. Clark Memorial Lecture and the Dr. Anson L. Clark Presidential Scholarship at UT Dallas.