From Dakar to Dallas: Creative Disturbance attends Gamecamp Senegal

Virtual Africa on Creative Disturbance
The Virtual Africa on Creative Disturbance

The Audiolats channel Virtual Africa on Creative Disturbance hosted a video conference between Dallas and Dakar where UT Dallas students engaged with Gamecamp Senegal attendees on topics relating to games, language, culture and creative industries.
Students from the School of Art, Technology and Emerging Communication at UT Dallas held a virtual meeting with Gamecamp organizer Kofi Sika Latzoo and Goethe Institut Sénégal’s director Michael Jeismann, led by Virtual Africa’s project coordinator and ATEC doctoral student Yvan Tina.
The group discussed the issue of technological development in some areas, the various business models available for the gaming industry, the implementation of transmedia narratives across multiple platforms, the role of government agencies in creative industry, and the future of mobile gaming in Africa.
Gamecamp Senegal at the Geothe Institut Dakar

It follows from that discussion that microtransactions currently constitutes the most reliable business plan for game developers in Sénégal due to the high cost of internet plans that keep most people from being able to play online with their smartphones. The microtransaction strategy allows one to progress at his/her own pace and to access the game offline. The low tech approach, as opposed to high tech (virtual and augmented reality), doesn’t have good days ahead given the rapid growtth of technology. However, there are alternative solutions such as the use of solar energy to deal with the access to electricity and the internet. One could even envision the emergence on new games based on this ecological approach. Similarly, the potential of serious games, through the gamification of many aspects of life, offer the opportunity to overcome the challenge of education in some African countries.
The last issue to be pointed out remains the incredible diversity of African societies, with thousands of languages and cultures, presents a real difficulty for game designers. It remains, however, that multilingualism and the development of African storytelling (based, for example, on oral traditions or afrofuturist speculations) would be an incredible asset for anyone involved in the African creative industries.
The Gamecamp—a festival which ran from July 14-17, 2016 in Dakar, Senegal—is a partnership with the Goethe Institut, the International Game Developers Association (IGDA Sénégal) and Orange Telecommunications. The festival has toured many African countries since its inception and was marked this year by the release of Google’s Cardboard as well as of NVIDIA’s Shield, the most powerful box android TV in the market, and the cloud gaming Geforce Now.
The festival allows attendees the opportunity to discover many games that have been developed in Sénégal such as Da’karapid, Cross Dakar City, HA Buggy and Diambar. Workshops for game designers on Unity, Game Design Canvas and several gaming tournaments (Call of Duty, Leagues of Legend) as well as an initiation to 360 panoramic photography (ConceptSky VT) are also offered in this program.

Yvan Tina, PhD Student publishes papers in the Technoetic Arts Journal and SciArt Magazine

Yvan Tina is a Phd Student in the School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Communication and member of ArtSciLab. His work investigates the possible convergences of biotechnology, synthetic biology, and artificial life with the performing arts. He is a member of the international, multilingual podcast platform Creative Disturbance where he regularly contributes to Meta–Life and Virtual Africa.
His recent publications include:
1. On Complexism: Pulsion and Computation, Technoetic Arts Journal, Volume 14, Issue 1-2, June 2016
taThis article discusses a concept introduced by art theorist Philip Galanter in several publications over the past decade: complexism is a notion that looks at both past and future while aiming to reconcile (post) modern aesthetics with the cybernetic and biological paradigms. This article focuses on the re-evaluation of the performance arts within the framework of this theory, favoring the idea that every artwork necessarily resists attempts of subordination.
2. Straight Talk with Yvan Tina, SciArt Magazine, April 2016
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In this article Yvan’s insights provide a bridge between the sometimes disparate domains of art and science —a perspective increasingly necessary with the rapid emergence of new materials and technologies available for artistic appropriation.

Creative Disturbance at ISEA

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Director of Design and Research for the ArtSciLab Cassini Nazir recently presented at the 22nd International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA), which was held in Hong Kong.
Talking on a panel titled “Creative Work and Well-Being,” Nazir discussed technical and design challenges for nurturing crowd sourced conversations on the Creative Disturbance platform. He outlined innovative methods in design, development and production for the podcast series.

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“Creative Disturbance is a platform developed in response to the need for a rupture in the arcane networks that currently connect creative people,” Nazir said. “We’re reaching an international, multilingual network and facilitating collaboration among the arts, sciences, and new technologies communities.”

Creative Disturbance celebrates its third year and at the time of the conference features 65 hours of content in ten languages, with over 270 contributors.
Creative Disturbance was one among many projects from UT Dallas faculty accepted into ISEA 2016:

  •  a robot that sleepwalks and Error as Armor. Data Obfuscation in the Yakamoto Industries Project, Dean Terry
  •  Vigil for Some Bodies, xtine burrough
  •  AIDS Quilt Touch Project, Anne Balsamo and Dale MacDonald

Founded in the Netherlands in 1990, ISEA International (formerly Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts) is an international non-profit organization fostering interdisciplinary academic discourse and exchange among culturally diverse organizations and individuals working with art, science and technology.

Over seven days, more than 450 speakers, workshops and presentations explored the theme of “Cultural Revolution,” investigating the borders between academia and artwork, practice and theory, systems and reality, and art and society.